Chloride Analyzer | Sulfate Analyzer
 
Menu

Chloride and Sulfate Analyzer

Ppb-Level Chloride and Sulfate Detection for Cycle Chemistry

Chloride and sulfate analyzers are on-line devices designed for continuous ppb-level monitoring of chloride and sulfate in a water system. METTLER TOLEDO's 3000CS is a combined chloride analyzer and sulfate analyzer that employs microfluidic capillary electrophoresis technology to monitor and promptly catch contamination so corrective action can be taken. This joint chloride analyzer and sulfate analyzer is designed for on-line cycle chemistry measurements and makeup water.

Filter:Clear All

Comparison

888 687 7687
Call Service
Uptime
Support & Repair
Performance
Maintenance & Optimization
Expertise
Training & Consulting

FAQs

What is a chloride and sulfate analyzer?

A chloride and sulfate analyzer is an on-line device for automated, ppb-level monitoring of chloride and sulfate in a water stream. The 3000CS chloride and sulfate analyzer is designed for power plant cycle chemistry and makeup water measurements, and uses microfluidic capillary electrophoresis technology.

What is microfluidic capillary electrophoresis?

Microfluidic capillary electrophoresis uses voltage to separate ions in a capillary. Ions move at different speeds in the capillary based on size to charge ratio, leading to separation of the ions. This is the technology that allows the METTLER TOLEDO chloride and sulfate analyzer to provide ppb-level measurements of both chloride and sulfate.

How is microfluidic capillary electrophoresis used in analyzing chlorides and sulfates?

A microfluidic capillary electrophoresis cartridge is used in the chloride and sulfate analyzer to separate the ions in the sample water, providing concentrated clusters of chloride and sulfate ions to travel through the capillary. Concentration of these ions is measured in ppb using a conductivity cell on the cartridge, and is then displayed on the chloride and sulfate analyzer.

What is the effect of chloride and sulfate ions on power plant equipment?

Chlorides and sulfates are the most corrosive contaminants in power plant water. They cause corrosion, pitting, stress corrosion cracking, decrease in efficiency with corrosion product deposits, and under-deposit corrosion. These damage expensive plant equipment such as turbines and boilers, leading to unplanned shutdowns for maintenance and repairs. When employing a chloride and sulfate analyzer to monitor these corrosive contaminants, the chloride analyzer can detect early traces of corrosive ions to minimize damage to power plant equipment.

What are chloride ions? How do chloride ions get into water?

The chloride ion is part of many salts, such as NaCl. Salts are commonly found in nature and are easily soluble in water, causing chloride contamination. METTLER TOLEDO chloride analyzers frequently monitor chloride levels in a water stream to ensure there is no corrosion or damage caused to machinery.

What are sulfate ions? How do sulfate ions get into water?

The sulfate ion is part of many salts, such as Na2SO4. Salts are commonly found in nature and are easily soluble in water, causing sulfate contamination. In power plants, sulfate ions can also get into water from breakdown of sulfonated resins. METTLER TOLEDO sulfate analyzers are an on-line device used for automated ppb-level monitoring of sulfate in a water stream to alert users of potential corrosion or damage.

How do you control chloride and sulfate in power plants?

Through proper water treatment, quality of the water introduced into the water/steam cycle can be ensured to have low levels of chlorides and sulfates. If a chloride and sulfate analyzer finds excess chlorides and sulfates in the water/steam cycle, they can be purged using boiler blowdown and fresh makeup water introduced into the cycle.

Where do you monitor sulfate and chloride in a power plant?

The most important measurement point in the water/steam cycle for chlorides and sulfates is at the turbine inlet. This ensures that only acceptable levels of chlorides and sulfates enter with the steam into the turbine, the most expensive capital equipment in the power plant. Another important measurement point is after the condensate polisher to monitor for sulfonated resin breakdown. It is also essential to employ a chloride and sulfate analyzer to monitor these ions before the boiler, to ensure the boiler is not damaged. It also provides an opportunity to remove chlorides and sulfates from the water/steam cycle via boiler blowdown if high levels of the ions are detected at the boiler inlet.

Low chloride and sulfate levels are ensured in makeup water by monitoring them after all treatment stages, before the water is sent to the storage tank that feeds the water/steam cycle.

Are there guidelines for maximum acceptable limits for chlorides and sulfates?

Key regulatory bodies and research organizations such as ERPI (USA), IAPWS (Global) and TPRI (China) specify acceptable limits in their guidelines for power plant operation. Turbine manufacturers also specify acceptable limits in their warranties to ensure optimum performance of the turbine and corrosion control. All METTLER TOLEDO chloride and sulfate analyzers are compliant with these regulatory requirements.

What are the acceptable limits of these ions?

Acceptable limits are 2 or 3 ppb each of chloride and sulfate for makeup water and water/steam cycle.

Does conductivity measure sulfates and chlorides?

No, conductivity is a cumulative measurement of all contaminants in water and cannot distinguish between harmful contaminants such as chloride and sulfate and benign components such as carbon dioxide. It does not provide a ppb-level measurement for chlorides and sulfates.

Is there an ideal way to monitor chlorides and sulfates?

Yes. Chlorides and sulfates should be measured directly at key measurement points in power plants using a chloride and sulfate analyzer. Measurements should be in ppb of each ion, not a cumulative measurement of all contaminants in the water. 

Using grab samples to conduct analysis in the lab causes delay in measurements, which could lead to damage to power plant equipment. Such a measurement method also has a risk of contamination while collecting and transporting grab samples, leading to false positives and unnecessary maintenance activities and resulting in increased plant downtime.

Thank you for visiting www.mt.com. We have tried to optimize your experience while on the site, but we noticed that you are using an older version of a web browser. We would like to let you know that some features on the site may not be available or may not work as nicely as they would on a newer browser version. If you would like to take full advantage of the site, please update your web browser to help improve your experience while browsing www.mt.com.