Reaction Discovery & Development of Kinetics | Webinar
On Demand Webinar

Reaction Discovery and Development with Kinetics

On Demand Webinar

Discover the Advantages of Reaction Kinetic Progress Analysis (RPKA)

Reaction Discovery and Development with Kinetics
Reaction Discovery and Development with Kinetics


Professor Ryan Baxter of University California - Merced discusses reaction discovery and development with kinetics.  His presentation involves the kinetic analysis of two organometallic reactions. Nickel-catalyzed reductive couplings are studied using the Reaction Progress Kinetic Analysis (RPKA) method. Each kinetic method is discussed in detail from raw Infrared (IR) spectroscopy data to the analysis of kinetic driving forces.  The advantages of Reaction Progress Kinetic Analysis (RPKA) are highlighted via the discussion of graphical analysis, a user-friendly visual comparison of rate data.

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Professor Ryan Baxter - University of California - Merced
30 Minutes
English

Who Should View This Presentation?
Scientists interested in reaction discovery and development with kinetics in the Pharmaceutical, Chemical, and Petrochemical Industries as well as Academia.

Reaction Discovery and Development with Kinetics
Professor Ryan Baxter - University of California - Merced

Presenter: Ryan Baxter, Ph.D.
Professor Baxter earned his Bachelor of Science from the University of Wisconsin, Madison performing research in the laboratory of Professor Sam Gellman.  He earned his Masters and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan while studying the kinetics of nickel-catalyzed reductive couplings with Professor John Montgomery.  He then performed postdoctoral research with Professors Donna Blackmond and Phil Baran at the Scripps Research Institute.  During this time, he was involved in the development of sulfinate radical precursors for heterocycle functionalization.  He also investigated the mechanism of palladium-catalyzed olefinations in collaboration with Professor Jin-Quan Yu.  During his independent career, Professor Baxter’s lab has developed new synthetic methods using radical chemistry from inexpensive or renewable radical precursors.  His lab often relies on in situ reaction monitoring to streamline reaction development and discover new modes of reactivity.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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