Challenges in Process Safety Assurance of a Hazardous Epoxidation - METTLER TOLEDO
On Demand Webinar

Challenges in Process Safety Assurance of a Hazardous Epoxidation

On Demand Webinar

This case study summarizes the retrospective process to assure safety of an energetic epoxidation process following regulatory intervention action.

Challenges in Process Safety Assurance of a Hazardous Epoxidation
Challenges in Process Safety Assurance of a Hazardous Epoxidation

Older, existing plant processes are not immune from a requirement to demonstrate that a safe system of work exists. Often, they present the greatest risks as process safety knowledge and regulatory expectations evolve over time. This case study summarizes the retrospective process to assure safety of an energetic epoxidation process following regulatory intervention action. The critical role of reaction calorimetry (and reaction characterisation) in the assurance of safe processes id highlighted. 

The process involves a number of hazardous materials and process safety risks. The presentation focuses on the integration of various disciplines required to construct the safety case taking in to account reaction thermochemistry and kinetics, identification of hazardous scenarios, experimental quantification of the consequence of hazardous scenarios, layers of protection analysis, safety instrumented systems and relief system design - all of which are required to construct a sound safety case. Taken together - and with several changes to the plant/process - a tolerable residual risk can be demonstrated.

Join the hundreds of researchers who have already viewed this presentation.

Steven Rowe - DEKRA Organisation and Process Safety
English

The presentation focuses on the criticality of good calorimetry data to characterize and understand the reaction, as well as the consequence of deviation scenarios. Without good calorimetric data, you cannot have a reliable basis of safety. The case study concludes with the requirement for engagement of laboratory chemists in process safety, including an engineering contribution to the chemical development process. Overall, there are a number of lessons to be learned by those developing new processes and those operating older processes.

Stephen Rowe - DEKRA Organisation and Process Safety
Thank you for visiting www.mt.com. We have tried to optimize your experience while on the site, but we noticed that you are using an older version of a web browser. We would like to let you know that some features on the site may not be available or may not work as nicely as they would on a newer browser version. If you would like to take full advantage of the site, please update your web browser to help improve your experience while browsing www.mt.com.